Rice pudding

Rice pudding is one of those dishes that I never thought I would like until I tried it. Mixing something that’s usually considered savory with sugar and cream just seemed strange. But the first time I had good, chilled rice pudding I gave in completely.

My favorite recipe so far is from Barefoot Contessa. I believe she uses raisins and a splash of rum, but I skip those and have it plain.

Rice Pudding

3/4 c. white basmati rice
1/2 t. kosher salt
5 c. half-and-half (really)
1/2 c. sugar
1 large egg, beaten
1-1/2 t. pure vanilla extract
1/2 t. cinnamon

Combine the rice and salt with 1-1/2 cups water in a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan. Bring it to a boil, stir once and simmer, covered, on low heat for 8 to 9 minutes, until most of the water is absorbed.

Stir in 4 cups half-and-half and sugar and bring to a boil. Simmer, uncovered, for 25 minutes, until the rice is very soft. Stir often, particularly toward the end.

Temper the egg by adding a few ladles of liquid before stirring it into the pot (this is optional — it will still taste great without the egg). Cook for 1 minute more. Off the heat, add the remaining cup of half-and-half, vanilla and cinnamon. Stir well. Chill and serve.

Shipwreck stew

This is one of those recipes that came out of a random cookbook, probably from the ’70s, and became a fixture in our home growing up. It’s called Shipwreck Stew, but it’s really a casserole you bake for two hours. Make it on a Sunday and you’ll have dinner a couple nights that week.

Originally it was made with ground beef and chopped tomatoes, which became really dry on top. I adapted it several times when I became vegetarian and am finally satisfied with this version.

Shipwreck Stew

1 large onion, chopped
4 ribs celery, chopped
2 T. butter
3 c. peeled and diced golden potatoes
1/2 c. uncooked basmati rice
1 28-oz. can dark kidney beans, drained
1 28-oz. can crushed tomatoes
1 T. Worcestershire sauce
1 T. chili powder

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Brown onions and celery in skillet in butter over medium heat. Mix Worcestershire sauce and chili powder into can of crushed tomatoes. Layer half of the onions/celery, then potatoes, rice, beans and tomatoes in 9X13 baking dish and repeat with other half. Cover with foil and bake for two hours. Check on it once to make sure the rice is not drying out.

To make it meaty: Add a layer of ground beef (raw, so it will cook in the 2 hours).

*Update! My dad shared with me the story of where this recipe came from. Thanks, dad!

In 1973 or so my girlfriend at the time in Manhattan lived in a kind of commune hippy house with several other people. They each shared cooking duties and prepared meals for the whole house. One of the members (a guy of course) had really no experience in cooking, so he began perusing cookbooks for something relatively easy that would serve 8 people. At last he found a recipe called Shipwreck stew in one of the cookbooks that belonged to my girlfriend. With its simple ingredients and preparation the resulting dish was much loved by all the hippies in the house! Anyway somehow the cookbook ended up at my apartment and didn’t make it back to her after we parted ways. So I kept the cookbook and now you and Megan have experienced the magic of the hippy commune Shipwreck stew. I’m sure that it will be shared with friends and future generations to come.