My next Skillshare class

If you’ve ever wanted to try arm knitting, here’s your chance! I just put up my second class on Skillshare.
Intro to arm knitting: make a quick cowl

As always, you can use my link to get a discount on signing up for Skillshare.


The class teaches you single and double loop options.

And, for the rest of October, a limited number of students can take my class for free.

Now that Max is in daycare, I have some free time to film more classes, so I’m working on some for my giant knitting channel. If there’s anything you want to learn, let me know!

Super bulky cowl

If you’re looking for a project that works up quickly (a la the arm-knit cowl), try this one. I can have one of these babies finished in half an hour!

At first this project came up out of necessity — my other cowl patterns were just taking too long to make, especially when I needed to make lots of them for shows. But now I think I would make this cowl anyway, just because it is so cute and so warm.

Super bulky cowl

Materials

• 4 skeins Lion Brand wool-ease thick and quick yarn in navy (or your favorite color). *Note: 2 skeins is actually just the right amount for this cowl, but you will have to separate them into 4 equal parts to make the cowl.
Other super bulky weight yarns would also work great for this.

• Size US 50/25 mm knitting needles (the biggest they have, baby)

• yarn needle to weave in ends

Instructions

Start by holding 4 strands of yarn together and tying a knot in the end. Leave a few inches of tail and then cast on 6 stitches.

Work in garter stitch (knitting every row) until the piece measures approximately 48 inches. Bind off, leaving about 12 inches of tail to sew up the seam.

Tie another knot on the end of the tail and then use it to seam the two ends of the cowl together. I usually just do this part with my hands. When you’re done, you can cut off the knots from both tails and then use the yarn needle to weave any remaining ends into the cowl. I usually make a few knots just so the seam is nice and secure. Then snip off any extra yarn.

The garter stitch pattern makes this cowl nice and stretchy, so you can wear it doubled up or let it hang longer like a scarf. 

Cozy knit reversible cowl

Here’s another freebie pattern that I absolutely love for fall and winter. This cowl is super warm and cozy, and the bonus is that it is ribbed on one side and bobbly on the other. You can wear it long like a scarf, or doubled up around your neck. Or you can even pull it over your head like a hood or lower on your shoulders like a shawl.

Cozy knit reversible cowl

Materials

• 3 skeins Lion Brand Wool-Ease Thick and Quick yarn in cranberry (or your favorite color)
Other super bulky yarns would work great for this, too.

• Size US 15/10 mm straight knitting needles

• Yarn needle to sew up the seam

Instructions

Cast on 32 stitches.
Row 1: K1P1 across.
Row 2: Knit.
Repeat these two rows until the piece measures 52 inches. Bind off on last knit row, leaving a long tail to sew up the seam.

With right sides facing and using the long tail of yarn, sew up the seam using mattress stitch or your favorite seaming stitch. Weave in any ends and turn the piece right-side-out.

*You could also just leave the piece as a scarf and make it longer or shorter. Up to you!

Stripey baby leg warmers

Unfortunately, the now-defunct Goodsmiths site has finally come down. So a lot of my blog projects that had been published there have disappeared. I’m not going to try to save all of them, but I would like to re-post some patterns that I have posted on Ravelry, and add some new ones. 

I’m gonna start with this baby leg warmer pattern because I enjoyed making these so much for Harper when she was a baby. 

They’re made with a fuzzy acrylic yarn that is machine washable and comes in a lot of great colors. You can knit them up plain or go with the stripe sequence I came up with. And if you like that yarn, you can also get my pattern for stretchy leg warmers that will grow with your kiddo from my Etsy pattern shop

Stripey baby leg warmers
sized for 0-3 months
make 2

Materials:

Lion Brand Jiffy yarn in colors: grape (A), country green (B), silver heather (C), and dark grey heather (D), (or any combination of 4 colors you like)

• Size 10.5 straight knitting needles

• Yarn needle to sew up seams

Instructions:

Cast on 18 stitches, leaving a 14-inch tail so you can sew up the seam at the end. Using a stockinette pattern (knit one row, purl one row), follow this stripe sequence:

5 rows A

4 rows B

2 rows C

3 rows D

2 rows A

3 rows C

1 row B

4 rows D

3 rows A

2 rows C

Bind off on your last row of C. Using your yarn needle, weave in any loose strings to the back side of the piece and snip off the ends. You can actually use these ends to carefully sew up the seam, matching the colors on each side. But if you don’t have the patience for that (half the time I don’t!), you can just use the long tail from the beginning of your work to sew up the seam. 

To make plain leg warmers, follow these instructions. You will only need one skein per pair. 

0-3 months 
Cast on 18 stitches. Knit in stockinette pattern until piece measures  7 inches. Bind off. 

3-6 months
Cast on 20 stitches. Knit in stockinette pattern until piece measures 8 inches. Bind off. 

6-12 months
Cast on 22 stitches. Knit in stockinette pattern until piece measures 9 inches. Bind off. 

Finishing

With right sides facing, use the long tail of yarn you left at the beginning of the piece to sew a seam all the way up to the top. You can use mattress stitch, or your favorite seaming stitch. Then snip off any extra yarn and turn the leg warmer right-side-out. Repeat with the second one. 

*If you don’t want a seam, you can always knit with DPNs or a magic loop instead. 

Arm knit cowl pattern

I’m happy to say that my first knitting class went very well. We had a huge turnout — 16 people. Which is a challenge as far as helping each person goes, but it was fun to see that many cowls come together in all different colors.

I put together a tutorial for the class and I thought I would make it available here in case anyone wants to give arm knitting a try. It’s certainly helpful to have the in-person instruction of a class. But there are a lot of helpful YouTube videos that are great if you are trying to teach yourself.

Download the PDF here.

The pattern shows you how to make either a single loop or longer double loop cowl.

I’m thinking that teaching more classes could be a really great next step for me in my business. So I’m trying to come up with more ideas for quick and easy projects. After churning out so many of the same design it’s fun to put on your super creative hat sometimes!

I’m teaching a class!

I’ve always thought it would be fun to teach a knitting class. So when the opportunity to teach one at Gather came up, I jumped. Gather is the awesome boutique in San Francisco that sells my rope baskets and some of my other knit accessories. They also have a big space that’s perfect for craft workshops. I’m going to be showing people how to arm knit a cowl, which could not be a quicker or easier craft. We’ll make a cowl that looks like this.

All the details are here. Gather provides wine and snacks, which is a sweet bonus!

Free cowl pattern

Earlier this year I designed a big chunky cowl that I thought I might sell when it started to get cold again. I’m still not sure if I have time to make them to sell, but I LOVE how the cowl turned out. I wrote up the pattern and posted it on Goodsmiths if you want to try it out.

Baby blankets

I finally made something for my own baby! I finished my first baby blanket for her, and I love how it turned out.

Though I am not usually too crazy about pink, I like the combination of pink and brown, so I went with that. It hardly took any time to knit the blanket and crochet the edges.

I am pretty much guaranteed to never have to buy a baby blanket, as we have received many beautiful ones already.


Every member of this household must know to cheer for the Jayhawks.

Just look at the hand-stitching on this quilt from my friend Amy.

I also received the loveliest print from my friend Brianne. She knows I love me some vintage Pyrex bowls.

I thought it deserved a place right above the cookbooks. As for my Pyrex collection, it will have to find a new spot in our home since it currently lives in the nursery-to-be.

New in the store: Rope baskets

A while back someone asked me on Ravelry if I had a pattern for rope baskets, similar to my poufs. At the time I said no, but I realized that an unstuffed pouf looks pretty darn close to a basket if you stand it up.

So I fiddled with the pattern until I got the right dimensions for a basket that would stand upright. And I just love how it turned out. I could use a few of these myself for all the projects I have lying around!

If you want to get one, they’re here.

A pouf of my own

Originally, this pouf was a return order. The color did not come out right, and then it went through an insane epidode with FedEx where it was accidentally shipped back to New York then back to me again. At one point I was told it had been destroyed. By the time it got here I was calling it the pouf from hell.

But, alas, I did not give up on it. I decided I would keep it for myself, dye it a much more attractive color, and use it as a footstool in our soon-to-be nursery. I opted for a nice neutral chocolate brown, and I really like it. I ended up mixing two browns together in hopes that the darker one would drown out the orange without making it too dark.

I think you could call it a pouf redeemed.